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Life or Death: 1PM – 2PM

allergy

Shapiro Breakout Room | 1pm – 2pm

In eastern philosophy, food is medicine and medicine is food. But for some people the food they eat and the medicine they take could quite literally kill them. We are in a new age of bioterrorism..one where children and adults alike are increasingly putting their lives at risk by acting on their most basic biological need – eating. Whether its direct consumption of peanut butter or eggs or shellfish or cross contamination from other foods containing one of these ingredients the danger is very real. And the same goes for antibiotics, insulin or other drugs that would normally help a person fight disease and survive. In this session, BWH scientists talk about what we know with respect to food and drug allergies, why our bodies react they way they do and what the latest  research findings suggest in terms of a cure for these extreme reactions.

Speakers

Joshua Boyce, MD

Joshua A. Boyce, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and is the Albert L. Sheffer Professor of Medicine in the Field of Allergic Disease. He serves as the Director of the Inflammation and Allergic Disease Research Section at the Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy at the Brigham and Womens Hospital. He is also Director of the Jeff and Penny Vinik Center for Allergic Disease Research. His research interests focus on lipid mediators of inflammation. His studies have been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1995. He was the Chairman of the Expert Panel that developed the NIAID-sponsored guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergy.

Duane Wesemann, MD, PhD
Associate Physician, Brigham and Women’s Hospital,Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

The Wesemann lab studies the process of primary immunoglobulin repertoire diversification and how environmental factors, such as commensal microbes and diet, may influence the structure and depth of this diversity. We are particularly interested in how exposures early in life may shape this process. In addition, we are undertaking innovative approaches to uncover therapeutic targets for the treatment of allergic disorders such as food allergies and asthma.
Jessica Savage, MD, MHS
Associate Physician, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Instructor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Savage is interested in how environmental factors may influence the development of the immune system and allergic disease. Her current focus involves how exposures to commonly encountered chemicals in personal care products (eg. toothpaste and lotions) may affect the human microbiome and lead to allergy.

 

Maria Castells, MD, PhD
Director of Allergy and Immunology Training Program, Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School, Director, Adverse Drug Reactions and Desensitization Program, Associate Director, Mastocytosis Center for Excellence

Dr. Castells is a clinician/teacher/researcher at the Brigham and Women’, Allergy Service, the Director of the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Training Program at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the Director of the Adverse Drug Reactions and Desensitization Program, and the Associate Director of the Mastocytosis Center for Excellence, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Session Co-Chairs

Joshua Boyce, MD

Joshua A. Boyce, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and is the Albert L. Sheffer Professor of Medicine in the Field of Allergic Disease. He serves as the Director of the Inflammation and Allergic Disease Research Section at the Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy at the Brigham and Womens Hospital. He is also Director of the Jeff and Penny Vinik Center for Allergic Disease Research. His research interests focus on lipid mediators of inflammation. His studies have been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1995. He was the Chairman of the Expert Panel that developed the NIAID-sponsored guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergy.


Mariana Castells, MD, PhD
Director of Allergy and Immunology Training Program, Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School, Director, Adverse Drug Reactions and Desensitization Program, Associate Director, Mastocytosis Center for Excellence

Dr. Castells is a clinician/teacher/researcher at the Brigham and Women’, Allergy Service, the Director of the Allergy and Clinical Immunology Training Program at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the Director of the Adverse Drug Reactions and Desensitization Program, and the Associate Director of the Mastocytosis Center for Excellence, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

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